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AAPG Bulletin

Abstract


Volume: 49 (1965)

Issue: 5. (May)

First Page: 601

Last Page: 609

Title: Seismic Previous HitRefractionNext Hit Study of Shallow Part of Continental Shelf Off Georgia Coast

Author(s): John W. Antoine (2), Vernon J. Henry, Jr. (3)

Abstract:

In December, 1962, personnel from Texas A&M University's Department of Oceanography and Meteorology and the University of Georgia Marine Institute shot nine reversed seismic Previous HitrefractionTop profiles over the shallow part of the continental shelf off the Georgia coast. These profiles were located to map refracting horizons underlying the submerged coastal plain and to correlate with earlier profiles in deeper water farther east shot in 1955 by groups from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and Lamont Geological Observatory. On all nine profiles, four distinct and apparently continuous layers were noted which, based on their depth, attitude, and velocity, are concluded to represent: 1) a layer a few feet beneath the sea bottom, probably Miocene in age; 2) the Oligocene; 3) t e early Eocene; and 4) the pre-Cretaceous basement surface. Structural contours on the Oligocene and Eocene refractors indicate the eastern boundary of the Atlantic embayment of Georgia. This feature was open toward the southeast in Oligocene time and toward the south in Eocene time. It is concluded also that the layer originally reported by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute to represent the Late Cretaceous is Oligocene or late Eocene in age.

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