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AAPG Bulletin

Abstract

AAPG Bulletin, V. 98, No. 3 (March 2014), P. 545561.

Copyright copy2014. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

DOI:10.1306/06141312191

Constraining the origin of reservoirs formed by sandstone intrusions: Insights from heavy mineral studies of the Eocene in the Forties area, United Kingdom central North Sea

Andrew Morton,1 Sean McFadyen,2 Andrew Hurst,3 Jeff Pyle,4 Philip Rose5

1HM Research Associates Ltd., 2 Clive Road, Balsall Common, United Kingdom, and CASP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0DH, United Kingdom; heavyminerals@hotmail.co.uk
2Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom; sean.mcfadyen.05@aberdeen.ac.uk
3Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom; ahurst@abdn.ac.uk
4Apache Corporation, Alba Gate, Stoneywood Park, Stoneywood Road, Dyce, Aberdeen, United Kingdom; jeffery.pyle@gbr.apachecorp.com
5Apache Corporation, Alba Gate, Stoneywood Park, Stoneywood Road, Dyce, Aberdeen, United Kingdom; phil.rose@gbr.apachecorp.com

ABSTRACT

The presence of hydrocarbon-bearing sandstones within the Eocene of the Forties area was first documented in 1985, when a Forties field (Paleocene) development well discovered the Brimmond field. Further hydrocarbons in the Eocene were discovered in the adjacent Maule field in 2009. Reservoir geometry derived from three-dimensional seismic data has provided evidence for both a depositional and a sand injectite origin for the Eocene sandstones. The Brimmond field is located in a deep-water channel complex that extends to the southeast, whereas the Maule field sandstones have the geometry of an injection sheet on the updip margin of the Brimmond channel system with a cone-shape feature emanating from the top of the Forties Sandstone Member (Paleocene). The geometry of the Eocene sandstones in the Maule field indicates that they are intrusive and originated by the fluidization and injection of sand during burial. From seismic and borehole data, it is unclear whether the sand that was injected to form the Maule reservoir was derived from depositional Eocene sandstones or from the underlying Forties Sandstone Member. These two alternatives are tested by comparing the heavy mineral and garnet geochemical characteristics of the injectite sandstones in the Maule field with the depositional sandstones of the Brimmond field and the Forties sandstones of the Forties field.

The study revealed significant differences between the sandstones in the Forties field and those of the Maule and Brimmond fields), both in terms of heavy mineral and garnet geochemical data. The Brimmond-Maule and Forties sandstones therefore have different provenances and are genetically unrelated, indicating that the sandstones in the Maule field did not originate by the fluidization of Forties sandstones. By contrast, the provenance characteristics of the depositional Brimmond sandstones are closely comparable with sandstone intrusions in the Maule field. We conclude that the injectites in the Maule field formed by the fluidization of depositional Brimmond sandstones but do not exclude the important function of water from the huge underlying Forties Sandstone Member aquifer as the agent for developing the fluid supply and elevating pore pressure to fluidize and inject the Eocene sand. The study has demonstrated that heavy mineral provenance studies are an effective method of tracing the origin of injected sandstones, which are increasingly being recognized as an important hydrocarbon play.

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