About This Item

Share This Item

The AAPG/Datapages Combined Publications Database

AAPG Bulletin

Abstract

AAPG Bulletin, V. 100, No. 5 (May 2016), P. 773-794.

Copyright ©2016. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1306/02031615002

Deep-water depositional mechanisms and significance for unconventional hydrocarbon exploration: A case study from the lower Silurian Longmaxi shale in the southeastern Sichuan Basin

Chao Liang,1 Zaixing Jiang,2 Yingchang Cao,3 Minghao Wu,4 Ling Guo,5 and Chunming Zhang6

1College of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum, No. 66, Changjiang West Road, Huangdao District, Qingdao 266580, China; [email protected]
2School of Energy Resource, China University of Geosciences, No. 29, Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China; [email protected]
3Geology Department, School of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum, No. 66, Changjiang West Road, Huangdao District, Qingdao 266580, China; [email protected]
4School of Energy Resource, China University of Geosciences, No. 29, Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China; [email protected]
5Department of Geology, Northwest University, No. 229, Taibai North Road, Xi’an 710069, China; [email protected]
6Department of Petroleum Geology, Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, No. 20, Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China; [email protected]

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this work was to study the depositional mechanisms and significance of the Longmaxi shale in the Sichuan Basin in southern China. Seven lithofacies were identified based on the detailed observation of outcrops and cores using petrographic and scanning electron microscope examination of thin sections and other data analyses: (1) laminated calcareous mudstone, (2) laminated carbonaceous mudstone, (3) laminated silty mudstone, (4) laminated claystone, (5) laminated siliceous shale, (6) siltstone, and (7) massive mudstone. The laminated mudstone and laminated claystone originated from suspension deposition, and siliceous shale is associated with ocean upwelling, whereas massive mudstone and siltstone were primarily deposited by turbidity currents. The depositional mechanisms have a great effect on the source rock and reservoir properties. Suspension deposition near oceanic upwelling zones can provide favorable conditions for the production and preservation of organic matter and are thus conducive to the formation of high-quality source rocks (total organic carbon content up to 5.4%). The reservoir storage spaces are primarily interlaminated fractures and organic pores with good physical reservoir properties (high porosity, permeability, and brittle mineral content). Turbidity currents may carry a large quantity of oxygen to the seafloor, resulting in the oxidation of organic matter, which is unfavorable for its preservation. The lithofacies formed by turbidity currents have relatively low total organic carbon contents (average: <1%). Structural fractures and intergranular pores are the primary storage spaces that are present in the reservoir. In summary, organic-rich shale and siliceous shale that was deposited from suspension near upwelling zones are key exploration targets for shale oil and gas. The widely distributed, multilayer, tight sandstone is important in the exploration for tight oil. A better understanding of the deposition mechanism and its effect on oil reservoirs may assist in identification of favorable areas for exploration.

Pay-Per-View Purchase Options

The article is available through a document delivery service. Explain these Purchase Options.

Protected Document: $10
Internal PDF Document: $14
Open PDF Document: $24

AAPG Member?

Please login with your Member username and password.

Members of AAPG receive access to the full AAPG Bulletin Archives as part of their membership. For more information, contact the AAPG Membership Department at [email protected].