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Abstract

AAPG Bulletin, V. 106, No. 4 (April 2022), P. 759-782.

Copyright © 2022. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1306/10212120127

Seismic reflection analysis of the deeply buried Neoproterozoic rift basin beneath Sichuan Basin, southern China

Jing Hu,1 Dong Jia,2 Guoqi Wei,3 Wuren Xie,4 Yiquan Li,5 Nan Su,6 Zhuxin Chen,7 Wei Yang,8 Zhigang Li,9 Chuang Sun,10 and Yong Zhang11

1State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China; [email protected]
2State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China; [email protected]
3Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, Beijing, China; [email protected]
4Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, Beijing, China; [email protected] petrochina.com.cn
5School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China; [email protected]
6Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, Beijing, China; [email protected]
7Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, Beijing, China; [email protected]
8Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, Beijing, China; [email protected] petrochina.com.cn
9School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, China; [email protected]
10School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, China; [email protected]
11State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China; [email protected]

ABSTRACT

The recent discovery of a giant gas field within the uppermost Neoproterozoic strata in the Sichuan Basin has motivated us to further investigate an underlying Neoproterozoic rift basin. Exploration in this deep-seated rift basin is currently lacking, and relevant wells are sparse. Therefore, this study analyzes the structure and evolution of the rift basin and characterizes the preliminary hydrocarbon conditions in this new and challenging exploration frontier. First, based on a systematic analysis of new Previous HitmagnetotelluricTop data and two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic reflection data, rift-related faults are identified with predominately northeast-southwest strikes. The rift basin comprises a series of graben and horst structures with sedimentary successions thicker than 5 km. Rift-related faults were active before the Ediacaran (635 Ma), with mafic sills intruding the lower part of the rift basin along the surface of the basement or faults. Second, the evolution and deposits of the rift basin are extrapolated from integrated studies, including sparse well data, seismic reflection analysis, and the surrounding geology. The results show that this rift basin formed during 800–635 Ma and probably resulted from the breakup of Rodinia. The infill may represent a lower volcanic succession of the Banxi Group and an upper glacial succession of the Cryogenian. Finally, some positive conditions for hydrocarbon prospectivity are discussed. These findings can be used to develop strategies for deep hydrocarbon exploration in China and to provide an additional example of Neoproterozoic rift basins worldwide.

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