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The AAPG/Datapages Combined Publications Database

Pacific Section of AAPG

Abstract


Geology of Southeastern San Joaquin Valley, California, Kern River to Grape Vine Canyon, 1965
Pages 16-25

Oil Field Abstracts

Wesley G. Bruer, Fred C. Porter

Kern Bluff Oil Field

Fred E. Porter

The Kern Bluff oil field is located approximately six miles northeast of the city of Bakersfield and lies one mile north of State Highway 178. The field is located about half way between the Kern River and Ant Hill oil fields. Maximum proved acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 600 acres.

The field was discovered in February 1944 by Shell Oil Company’s “Afana” 1 well located in the northwest corner of Sec. 18, T. 29 S., R. 28 E., M.D.B. & M. The well encountered oil showings in Transition zone and Santa Margarita sands of upper Miocene age and was completed from the 840 to 1,035 foot interval for an initial production of 18 barrels daily of 15° gravity oil cutting 64%. The “Afana” 1 was abandoned after four months when net oil production had declined to 7 barrels daily. Commercial oil production was established in September 1947 by Oceanic Oil Company’s (now Gulf Oil Company’s) “Needham-Bloemer” 15 well located about 1,150 feet northeast of the “Afana” 1 in Sec. 7 of T. 29 S., R. 29 E. The “Needham-Bloemer” 15 was completed from 100 feet of Transition zone and Santa Margarita oil sand between the 815 to 935 foot interval and initially produced 80 barrels daily of 15.6° gravity oil.

The Kern Bluff field is a southwesterly dipping homocline with closure in the northern and eastern areas being effected by normal faults of 250 and 100 foot proportions, respectively. Closure is also effected in the southern producing area by a normal fault of between 75 to 100 foot proportions.

Stratigraphically the beds penetrated in the Kern Bluff field consist of the Kern River-Chanac series undifferentiated of Pleistocene-Pliocene age and unconformably overlie the Transition zone and Santa Margarita producing zones of upper Miocene age. The Transition zone (Main) is the main producing horizon in the field, and its oil sands are characterized by their lack of sorting and the great numbers of cobbles and boulders which they contain. The Transition zone is found at an average depth of 1,250 feet and varies in thickness from 30 to 80 feet. The Transition is underlain by 8 to 12 feet of marine, carbonaceous siltstone which is considered to be the top of the Santa Margarita Formation and also acts as an excellent correlative marker. Santa Margarita oil sands have an average thickness of 55 feet; are of a cleaner, marine type and are productive only in wells located structurally high in the southern and northern producing areas. The formations encountered in the Kern Bluff have an average combined thickness of 4,230 feet and in order of penetration and average thickness are as follows: Kern River-Chanac series undifferentiated Pleistocene - Pliocene (1,000 feet), basal Chanac (Transition zone) and Santa Margarita sand of upper Miocene age (170 feet), Round Mountain silt of middle Miocene age (800 feet), Olcese sand of middle and lower Miocene age (650 feet), Freeman-Jewett silt of lower Miocene age (1,400 feet), Pyramid Hill sand of lower Miocene age (120 feet), and Vedder sand of lower Miocene age (90 feet), all unconformably overlying the basement complex.

The deepest well drilled in the field was Gene Reid Drilling, Inc.’s well No. “Muir” 13 located in Sec. 18, of T. 29 S., R. 28 E., M.D.B. & M. The well was bottomed at 5,425 feet in Vedder sands of lower Miocene age.

As of January 1, 1965, the Kern Bluff oil field has produced a total of 6,467,348 barrels of oil. Field production, as of December 1, 1964, averaged 532 barrels of 14° gravity oil. A total of 140 wells was completed in the field of which 121 are still producing.

Ant Hill Oil Field

Fred E. Porter

The Ant Hill oil field is located approximately seven miles east of the city of Bakersfield and lies about one mile southeast of State Highway 178. Maximum proven acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 305 acres.

The field was discovered in July 1944 by Amerada Petroleum Corporation’s “Southern Pacific” 36-15 well located in the southwest quarter of Sec. 15, T. 29 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. The well encountered oil showings in Olcese sands of middle and lower Miocene age and was completed from the 2180 to 2225 foot interval for an initial production of 80 barrels daily of 14° gravity oil cutting 14% water. A deeper sand discovery was made in November 1944 by Amerada in their “Southern Pacific” 8-15 well. The No. 8-15 encountered Jewett oil sand stringers of lower Miocene age and was completed from the 3670 to 3700 foot interval for an initial production of 182 barrels daily of 40° gravity oil cutting 1.7% water.

The Ant Hill field is located upon a southwest plunging anticlinal nose with closure being effected by faulting. Closure on the Olcese sand is afforded by a northwest-southeast trending normal fault which is downthrown to the northeast. Jewett zone closure is provided by a parallel, but older, fault which appears not to have been active since lower Miocene time. Numerous other small faults are present in the field, however they apparently do not affect production except in a minor way. There appears to be a maximum vertical closure of 200 feet.

Stratigraphically the beds penetrated in the Ant Hill field are typical of the southeastern San Joaquin Valley. The formations encountered have a total average thickness of 4,300 feet and in order of penetration they are as follows: Kern River-Chanac series of Pleistocene-Pliocene-upper Miocene age undifferentiated, Santa Margarita of upper Miocene age, Edison Shale of middle Miocene age, Olcese sand of middle and lower Miocene age, Freeman-Jewett silt and sands of lower Miocene age, Pyramid Hill sand of lower Miocene age and Vedder sands and clays of lower Miocene age, all unconformably underlain by the basement complex.

The Olcese sand is the uppermost productive formation, and although its formational thickness may range from 600 to 800 feet, oil sand is limited to the top 100 to 200 feet of the formation and grades into gray wet sand below. The average producing depth for Olcese sand is 2,300 feet, and its oil ranges in gravity from 12.2° to 14°. Lowermost production is obtained from the oil sand “fingers” of the Jewett Formation. Average producing depth for the Jewett “fingers” is 3,500 feet, and its oil gravity ranges from 38° to 40°.

The deepest field well, Standard Oil Company’s No. 72, located in the northeast corner of Sec. 21, T. 29 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. was bottomed at 4,412 feet in the basement complex. No oil production has been found below the Jewett Formation in the Ant Hill field.

The Ant Hill field has produced a total of 4,248,747 barrels of oil and 232,653 MCF of gas until January 1, 1965. Of this, 3,717,345 barrels of oil and 90 MCF of gas have come from the Olcese and 531,402 barrels of oil and 232,563 MCF of gas have been derived from the Jewett field production, as of December 1, 1964, averaged 381 barrels daily of oil ranging from 12.2° to 40° gravity. A total of 37 wells were completed in the field of which 8 were Jewett sand producers and 29 were Olcese sand producers. As of January 1, 1965, there were 19 wells producing, of which, 2 were Jewett sand wells and 17 were Olcese sand wells.

Edison Oil Field

Wesley G. Bruer

The Edison oil field extends from about five to twelve miles east-southeast of the city of Bakersfield and occupies portions of T. 29 S., R. 29 E. and T 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. California State Highway 58 (formerly U. S. Highway 466) crosses the northern part of the field.

As of January 1, 1965 the maximum proven area of the entire field was about 6,880 acres. Cumulative production was 97,052,964 barrels of oil and 57,537,705 MCF of gas. 948 wells had been completed and 676 were still producing.

Average production from all areas during November 1964 was 5,912 barrels of oil and 4,418 MCF of gas per day.

Edison Oil Field is usually divided into six areas as discussed below.

Edison Grove Area

The productive area of Edison Groves approximated 370 acres as of January 1, 1965.

The Area was discovered in December 1950 by the Richfield Oil Corporation “Shields-Arms” 1 (now 72-32) located in the northeast quarter of Sec. 32, T. 29 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. This well was completed from the interval 3503–3580 feet in the Olcese sand for an initial flowing production of 239 barrels per day of 12.5° oil cutting 3% water.

Oil accumulation in the Olcese sand occurs on a southwesterly plunging nose along which the productive portion of the sand progressively facies to shale in a northeasterly, or up dip direction. Although the Olcese sand has an overall thickness of up to 700 feet, the productive interval is limited to the upper 150 feet. Several faults offset the Olcese along the nose but do not appear to be important to the accumulation.

Production from the Chanac zone, nearly three quarters of a mile northeast of the Olcese pool, was established by the A. M. Dunn (now A. M. Dunn Estate) “DLK” 1A, completed in October 1953, in the southwest quarter of Sec. 28. Initial production was 20 barrels per day of 16° oil cutting 10%, pumping from intervals between 1174 and 1304 feet. Productive sand stringers in the overlying Kern River sediments were recognized in subsequent wells.

The structure at the Chanac and Kern River horizons is a very gentle southwest plunging nose. The Chanac sand decreases in permeability and lenses out laterally to the northwest and southeast, and up dip to the northeast. The productive Kern River sands are irregularly lenticular; the extent of the productive area of this zone has not been fully established.

Average drill depths to the zones are as follows: Olcese, 3450 feet; Chanac, 1130 feet; and Kern River, 950 feet.

As of January 1, 1965 cumulative production for Edison Groves was 1,524,084 barrels of oil and 133,144 MCF of gas. 55 wells had been completed and 51 were still producing.

Average production during November 1964 was 182 barrels of oil and 24 MCF of gas per day. Of this, 103 barrels of the oil and all the gas was produced from the Olcese.

Race Track Hill Area

The productive area of Race Track Hill approximated 1280 acres as of January 1, 1965.

The Area was discovered in September 1944 with the completion of the British-American and Capital Company “Portals” 53-3 in the northeast quarter of Sec. 3, T. 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. Initial production was 256 barrels daily of 38.5° clean oil flowing from Jewett sand through the open interval 4730–4766 feet. Follow-up drilling developed production from the underlying Pyramid Hill and Vedder sands. These three sands produce 40° to 42° oil and are the major producing zones of the area.

Later drilling developed less important production of limited areal extent from the Nozu, Wicker, Santa Margarita and Chanac zones. Gravity of the oil from these shallower sands ranges from 13° to 16°.

The irregular domal structure of the northern portion of the area within the lower Miocene sediments, and the highly complex fault pattern appear to result, at least in part, from draping over a pre-existing high anomaly in the metamorphic basement rocks. The structure at the top of the Santa Margarita sand is a moderately faulted, gentle nose plunging to the southwest.

Oil accumulations are primarily due to structural entrapment, with folding and faulting both important. Rapid stratigraphic variation is the trapping mechanism for some pools, particularly in the Wicker and Nozu zones and to a lesser extent in the Jewett and Pyramid Hill zones.

Average drill depths, which may vary as much as 700 feet to the lower zones within the field, are as follows: Vedder, 4730 feet; Pyramid Hill, 4620 feet; Jewett, 4570 feet; Nozu, 3260 feet; Wicker, 3200 feet; Santa Margarita, 1830 feet; and Chanac, 1070 feet.

As of January 1, 1965 Race Track Hill had produced 13,715,207 barrels of oil and 34,038,262 MCF of gas. 161 wells had been completed in the area and 102 were still producing.

Production during November 1964 averaged 964 barrels of oil and 2,263 MCF of gas per day. Of this total, the Vedder produced 376, Pyramid Hill 369, and Jewett 99 barrels of oil per day. The total from the remaining zones was 119 barrels per day.

Jeppi Area

The Jeppi area encompassed about 665 productive acres as of January 1, 1965.

The first productive well in the area was the First National Finance Corporation “De Mille-First National-Jeppi” 1 (now Atlantic “MJM&M-Jeppi” 1) located in the northwest quarter of Sec. 17, T. 30 S., R. 19 E., M.D.B. & M. The well was originally completed in February, 1948, had mechanical difficulties and was then recompleted in July of that year flowing 250 barrels of 22° oil per day cutting 2% water. Production was from the “Jeppi” (Chanac) zone from about 3300 to 3400 feet. Several subsequent wells also produce 20° oil from the underlying Santa Margarita sand.

The Pyramid Hill sand was found to be productive in 1952, and the Jewett and Vedder zones were established as producers shortly thereafter. The gravity of oil from these lower zones ranges from 38° to 40°.

The oil accumulations are in a series of fault blocks on a gentle southwest plunging nose which is a continuation of the Race Track Hill structure. The pools are generally bounded up dip by west-northwest trending faults and the whole area is bounded laterally by two northeast trending faults; one of these, the Graham fault which generally forms the southeasterly boundary of the area, has a vertical throw of as much as 1000 feet, downthrown on the southeast side, within the lower Miocene beds.

Average drill depths to the various productive zones in the area are as follows: Vedder, 6040 feet; Pyramid Hill, 5950 feet; Jewett, 5900 feet; Santa Margarita, 3500 feet; and Jeppi, 3300 feet.

As of January 1, 1965, the Jeppi area had produced 5,088,897 barrels of oil and 10,763,397 MCF of gas. 88 wells had been completed and 55 were still producing.

Average production for November 1964 was 141 barrels of oil and 482 MCF of gas per day.

West Area

The West area consisted of about 1465 productive acres as of January 1, 1965.

The area was discovered by the Shell “21 Community” 1 (now Wood-Callahan “21 Community” 5), located in the northeast quarter of Sec. 21, T. 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. The well was completed in May 1935 for 166 barrels of 21.5° oil per day cutting 1% water from the Nozu sand in the interval 4371 to 4415 feet. Follow-up drilling soon established production of 19° to 23° oil from the Chanac and Santa Margarita zones. The “Porter” (Olcese) zone was discovered in May 1951, and 40° gravity oil production from the Jewett-Vedder zone was established in January of 1957.

Structurally, the area is essentially a faulted southwest dipping homocline. The faults do not occur in any clearcut pattern although northwest-southeast and northeast-southwest trends predominate. Oil accumulations in the Santa Margarita appear to be wholly controlled by faulting. Faulting is the principle trapping mechanism in the other zones but up-dip lensing of sands within the Chanac is a factor in some areas and stratigraphic variations in the Nozu and Porter may also effect closure locally in those zones. Buttressing against basement rocks is at least partially responsible for the entrapment of oil in the Jewett-Vedder zone.

Drill depths to the productive zones vary rather widely across the area, but the average depths are as follows: Jewett-Vedder, 5100 feet; Porter, 4400 feet; Nozu, 4500 feet; Santa Margarita, 4000 feet, and Chanac, 3200 feet.

As of January 1, 1965, cumulative production was 15,678,220 barrels of oil and 1,953,453 MCF of gas. 205 wells had been completed and 143 wells still produced.

Average production during November 1964 was 968 barrels of oil and 217 MCF of gas per day.

Portals-Fairfax Area

The Portals - Fairfax area encompassed about 600 productive acres as of January 1, 1965.

The discovery well was the General Petroleum “Kerwin” 1 (now Don M. Cook “Seale” 5-5) located in the northwest quarter of Sec. 5, T. 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. Initial production was about 65 barrels per day of 14.4° oil and 20 barrels of water daily from the interval 3780 to 3945 feet in the Nozu zone. Production from the Wicker zone was established with the completion of the Lee Oil Company (now J. H. Siemon) “Edison Seale” 5-1 in the southeast quarter of Sec. 5. Initial production from this well was 100 barrels of 17.5° oil and 25 barrels of water per day from the interval 3782–4025 feet.

The structure on the productive horizons is a southwest dipping homocline broken by several faults which have a predominate northeast-southwest trend. Both the Wicker and Nozu sands pinch out to the north-northeast. The traps are therefore the result of a combination of faulting and stratigraphy.

The average gross thickness of the Wicker sand is about 60 feet and of the Nozu about 50 feet in the productive area. Average drill depth to the Wicker and Nozu zones is about 4200 and 4100 feet, respectively.

As of January 1, 1965, cumulative production from the area was 2,875,762 barrels of oil and 413,825 MCF of gas. 71 wells had been completed and 48 were still producing.

Average daily production during November 1964 was 313 barrels of oil and 32 MCF of gas, all from the Wicker zone.

Main Area

The Main area of the Edison oil field consisted of about 2500 productive acres as of January 1, 1965.

The discovery well for the Area was the L. C. Osborn 2 (now Humble) “Duff” 2, located in the southeast quarter of Sec. 15, T. 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. The well was completed in 1931 for 50 barrels of 13.7° oil daily cutting 21% water from the Kern River zone at a depth of about 1900 to 2000 feet. In May 1934, production of 18° to 23° oil was established from the Nozu, Jewett-“Vedder,” and Walker zones. Subsequent drilling discovered small areas of Santa Margarita and Wicker zone production.

While some oil was produced from fractured metamorphic basement rocks relatively early in the history of the field, this zone was not considered to be of major importance until the completion of the H. H. Magee, (now Trico) “Brockman” 3 in this unique reservoir. The well went on production in June, 1945 flowing 528 barrels per day of nearly clean 19.2° oil from the interval 2218 to 2301 feet. This led to rapid development of the so-called “Schist” pool. These rocks consist of both meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous types which occur as inliers or roof pendants within a somewhat younger granitic intrusive of probably Upper Jurassic age. The contact between the metamorphic and granitic rocks trends in a generally north-northeast south-southwest direction just to the east of the productive area.

The structure of the Main Edison area is that of an uplifted, southwesterly tilting metamorphic basement fault block. The principal faults are normal and trend primarily northwest - southeast and northeast - southwest. The fault which bounds the field on the northeast is downthrown to the northeast by as much as 1500 feet on the basement horizon.

The oil in the “Schist” is trapped structurally in a highly fractured fault block capped by Late Tertiary sediments, mostly Miocene shales. It is generally thought that these shales were also the source rock for the oil.

Oil is accumulated in the Walker, Jewett-“Vedder,” Nozu, and Wicker zones primarily as the result of lenticularity, buttressing and facies changes, although faulting is locally important.

The Santa Margarita pool is the result of: (1) a facies change from marine sands to less permeable non-marine sediments along a fossil Santa Margarita strand to the southeast and (2) faulting to the northeast.

Oil is trapped in the Kern River zone by the lenticularity of the sands and by faulting.

Drill depths to any particular zone may vary as much as 1000 feet or more across the field but approximate average depths are as follows: “Schist,” 2500 feet; Walker, 3200 feet; Jewett-“Vedder” and Nozu, 3000 feet; Santa Margarita 1400 feet; and Kern River, 1200 feet.

As of January 1, 1965, the cumulative production from the Main Edison area was 58,170,794 barrels of oil and 10,235,624 MCF of gas. 368 wells had been completed and 277 were still producing.

Average production during November 1964 was 3,343 barrels of oil and 1,400 MCF of gas per day. Of this amount, 2,492 barrels of the oil and 1,001 MCF of the gas came from the “Schist” zone.

Mountain View Oil Field

Fred E. Porter

The oil fields of the Mountain View-Arvin area occupy a narrow belt which extends about thirteen miles in a northwesterly direction from the Arvin area to about three miles southeast of the city of Bakersfield. The main area of the Mountain View field is comprised of the Northwest, Central and Southeast producing areas and, as of January 1, 1965, contains approximately 2,690 proven acres. The Arvin area of the field is comprised of the Arvin, West Arvin and Vaccaro producing areas and, as of January 1, 1965, contains about 1,645 proven acres.

The main area of the Mountain View field was discovered in May 1933 by Hogan Petroleum Company’s (now Dolley, Morton and Dolley’s) No. “Wharton” 1 well located in the northwest quarter of Sec. 32, T. 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. The “Wharton” 1 encountered oil showings in both Chanac sands of Pliocene-Miocene age and Santa Margarita sands of upper Miocene age and was completed as the first Santa Margarita producer in the field. The well initially produced 3,200 barrels daily of 34° gravity oil. An active drilling campaign followed this discovery, and the Main area of the Mountain View was largely delineated by late 1937. General Petroleum Company’s (now Argentena Consolidated Mining Company’s) No. “Arvin” 1 well, located near the center of Sec. 26, T. 31 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M., extended the Mountain View field into the Arvin area in late 1937. The “Arvin” 1 well was completed from Chanac and Santa Margarita sands in the 6670 to 7160 and 7300 to 7395 foot intervals, respectively, and initially produced 36 barrels daily of 32° gravity oil cutting 36% water. Subsequent exploratory and development drilling in the Arvin, West Arvin and Vaccaro areas of the Mountain View field later outlined the various local accumulations now known as the Cattani, Chanac-Cattani, Richards, George, Stenderup, Main and Northwest Houchin, Brite and Frick Pools. Mountain View field development was largely completed by 1961, however, active development is still continuing in the Section 19 Pool, a Chanac-Transition zone sand accumulation located north of the Main field producing area, as well as occasional fill-in or extension wells and directional redrills.

The Mountain View oil field is situated upon a broad southwesterly dipping homocline with closure being effected by a system of westerly and northwesterly trending faults cutting generally across the northwesterly striking beds which dip to the west and southwest at the rate of 1,200 feet per mile. One of the most prominent structural features in the field is the Mountain View fault, a relatively high angle thrust fault, which runs in a southeasterly direction from the Main area of the field into the Arvin area. The fault is generally downthrown to the east-northeast for about 200 feet and appears to provide entrapment for oil produced in most areas of the field. The apparent surface trace of the fault may be observed in the Main area of the field near the center of Sec. 29, T. 30 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M., where it forms an escarpment which runs in a northwest-southeast direction and appears to be down-thrown to the northeast approximately 50 to 60 feet. Numerous other normal faults are present in the field, however they only appear to alter production in a minor way. In general, the sealing effect of Mountain View field faults is due to a very thin gouge which, because of the high silt and clay content of the sands, forms an effective seal against the migration of oil.

The Mountain View oil field is located upon the western edge of the Caliente alluvial fan and extends northwestward into the low lands between this fan and that of the Kern River. These upper sands and fanglomerates grade downward into the non-marine Kern River-Chanac series of Pleistocene-Pliocene age. There is some evidence that a portion of the basal Chanac formation (Transition zone) may be of upper Miocene age. The gradation from Kern River to Chanac appears to be conformable except in the Central and Southeast producing areas of the Main field and in portions of the Arvin-West Arvin producing areas where a marine Etchegoin “finger” of Pliocene age separates the two series. The oil bearing portion of the Chanac is limited to the lower 950 to 1000 feet of the formation and of this about 300 to 325 feet is oil sand. Chanac sands are productive in the greater part of the Mountain View field and in the Main field area they are divided into the Nichols, Hood and Transition zones younger to older, respectively. Upper Chanac producing sands (Nichols zone) are encountered in the Main field area at depths ranging from 4,475 to 5,375 feet and varying from 50 to 200 feet in thickness. Lower Chanac producing sands (Hood and Transition zones) in the Main area are encountered at depths ranging from 4,650 to 6,050 feet and attain thicknesses of 80 to 140 feet. Chanac oil sands in the Arvin-West Arvin producing areas are divided downward into upper Chanac and lower Chanac zones, the lowermost commonly called Cattani. Upper Chanac sands are encountered in the Arvin-West Arvin areas at an average depth of 5,900 feet and have an effective thickness of 110 feet. Lower Chanac, or Cattani zone sands, are encountered in these areas at an average depth of 6,500 feet and have a usual thickness of about 60 feet. Portions of the upper Chanac sands found in both the Main and Arvin-West Arvin areas are definitely of marine origin and probably represent an Etchegoin wedge of Pliocene age. The lower Chanac grades downward into a series of silty, carbonaceous, often pebbly sands of upper Miocene age known as the Santa Margarita Formation. Santa Margarita sands have been the most prolific oil producers in the Main field area and to a more limited extent in the George, Houchin and North Houchin Pools of the Arvin-West Arvin field areas. Santa Margarita sands are encountered in the Main field area at depths ranging from 4,800 to 6,200 feet and have an effective thickness of 65 feet. Santa Margarita sands and Houchin sands, found lower in the Santa Margarita Formation, are encountered in Arvin-West Arvin areas at an average depth of 6,700 feet and have a thickness range of from 0 to 200 feet. Below the Santa Margarita is a series of carbonaceous, sandy siltstones commonly considered to be the equivalent of the Fruitvale shale of upper Miocene age. The Fruit-vale shale occasionally contains lenticular sand wedges containing oil, one being the Stenderup producing zone of the Stenderup Pool in the West Arvin area of the field. The Stenderup zone commonly contains several hundred feet of oil sand and is encountered at depths ranging from 9,000 to 10,300 feet. The Fruitvale shale in the main field area is locally underlain by the Wicker sand of lower upper Miocene age. The Wicker sand producing area is generally restricted to the northwest producing area of the Main field area and many geologists considered it to be a channel deposit. In general, the Fruitvale shale is underlain in the Main field area by a series of silty, platy shales known as the Round Mountain Formation of middle Miocene age. The Round Mountain locally contains oil sand lenses, one being the Nozu sand. The Nozu is encountered in the Northwest portion of the Main field area at an average depth of 7,300 feet and has an effective thickness of about 37 feet. The Round Mountain is underlain by Olcese sands of middle and lower Miocene age. Olcese sands are productive in only one well, Norris Oil Company’s “Norris-Frick” No. 41-16, located in the West Arvin field area. Here Olcese producing sands are encountered at 8,300 feet and have a thickness of about 88 feet. The Olcese is underlain by members of the Freeman-Jewett Formations of lower Miocene age. Jewett sands are productive only in the Brite Pool located in the West Arvin field area. Wells in this Pool produce from Jewett sands ranging in depth from 8,100 to 9,850 feet. The sands vary in thickness from 0 to 250 feet. The Freeman-Jewett is underlain by members of the Pyramid Hill and Vedder Formations of lower Miocene age, neither formation having contributed oil or gas in commercial quantities to date. The Vedder is underlain by non-marine beds of the Walker Formation which rests directly on a schist basement complex. A small amount of oil is being produced from the schist in the southeastern portion of the Main field.

The deepest well drilled in the Mountain View field was Union Oil Company’s No. “Union-Signal-Stenderup” 55X-21 located near the center of Sec. 21, T. 31 S., R. 29 E., M.D.B. & M. The well was bottomed at 12,514 feet in Freeman-Jewett sands of lower Miocene age.

As of January 1, 1965. the Mountain View oil field has produced a total of 71,671,853 barrels of oil and 77,157,406 MCF of gas. Of this total production, the Main Mountain View field area has produced 59,967,754 barrels of oil and 57,078,970 MCF of gas and the Arvin area of the field has produced 12,704,099 barrels of oil and 20,078,436 MCF of gas. Field production, as of December 1, 1964, averaged 2,381 barrels daily of oil ranging from 18° to 35° gravity. A total of 490 wells were completed in the field of which 218 are still producing. Of the latter, 121 wells are still producing in the Main field area and 97 are in the Arvin field area.

Comanche Point Oil Field

Fred E. Porter

The Comanche Point oil field is located approximately twenty miles southeast of Comanche Point and occupies portions of Secs. 29, 32 and 33 of T. 12 N., R. 18 W., S.B.B. & M., Kern County, California. Total proven acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 35 acres.

The field was discovered in October 1947 by Horace Steele and L. C. Gould’s (now Sam B. Newman and S. H. Gibbon’s) “Gould” 1 well which is located in the northeast corner of Sec. 32 of T. 12 N., R. 18 W., M.D.B. & M. The “Gould” 1 encountered showings of heavy oil in Santa Margarita sands of upper Miocene age and was completed from the 405 to 640 foot interval for an initial production of 25 barrels daily of 13° to 14° gravity oil. Field development was largely completed by 1948 at which time 12 wells had been drilled and completed. Initial completions ranged from 5 to 30 barrels daily of 12.5° to 14° gravity oil cutting from 5 to 70 per cent relatively fresh water. Average daily production per well by the end of 1962 had declined to 2 barrels daily. Only one well, Carla Stafford Lewis’s “Carla” 2 (now Lew Ault and Associates), located in the southern portion of Sec. 29, has ever produced oil from sands older than the Transition-Santa Margarita series. The “Carla” 2 produced 1,065 barrels of oil from a middle Miocene sand overlying the basement before it was abandoned in 1950.

Structurally the Comanche Point oil field is located upon a faulted anticlinal nose with closure being effected by controlling normal faults which bound the field to the north and east.

The field lies within a prominent embayment outlined by the outcrop of granitic basement. Thin veneer of sediments, including many large boulders, covers the basement complex. The formations encountered have an average total thickness of 1,430 feet and in order of penetration are as follows: terrace deposits and fanglomerates of Recent age (100 feet); Chanac Formation, including 30 feet of basal Transition zone, of Pliocene-Miocene age (430 feet); Santa Margarita Formation (100 feet) and “Comanche Point” sand (150 feet), Pulv. zone (250 feet), of upper Miocene age; Valv. zone (250 feet and middle Miocene sands (250 feet), all of middle Miocene age rest unconformably upon the basement complex.

With the exception of the above “Carla” 2 well, the Comanche Point oil field produces oil exclusively from sands of the Transition zone and Santa Margarita Formation of upper Miocene age. Producing intervals range in thickness from 50 to 230 feet with effective well depths ranging from 600 to 670 feet.

The deepest well drilled in the field was Standard Oil Company’s “Tejon Ranch 2” 4-32 located near the west one-quarter corner of Sec. 32. The well was bottomed at 3,492 feet in the basement complex.

The Comanche Point oil field has produced a total of 86,146 barrels of oil since its discovery in 1947 until January 1, 1965. Field production, as of December 1, 1964, averaged 12 barrels daily of 13° to 14° gravity oil. A total of 12 wells were completed in the field of which 7 are still producing.

Tejon Hills Oil Field

Fred E. Porter

The Tejon Hills oil field is located approximately twenty miles southeast of the city of Bakersfield along the southeast margin of the San Joaquin Valley. Proved acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 945 acres.

The field was discovered in August 1948 by Tejon Hills Company’s (now Sunset International Petroleum Corporation’s) “Sunset-Tejon” 2 located in the southwest quarter of Sec. 10, T. 11 N., R. 18 W., S.B.B. & M. The well encountered oil showings in Santa Margarita sands and was completed from the 375 to 408 foot interval for an initial production of 62 barrels daily of 29° gravity oil. Field development was rapid following the discovery, and limits of the field were largely defined by 1953. Production is from Santa Margarita sands of upper Miocene age, Valv. zone sands of middle Miocene age, DK (Vedder equivalent) sands of lower Miocene age and LO sands of Oligocene (?) age. Average producing depths and sand thicknesses are as follows:

PRODUCING ZONE AVERAGE DEPTH AVERAGE THICKNESS OIL GRAVITY
Santa Margarita 375 feet 50 feet 29°
Valv. Zone 1,350 feet 30 feet 29°
DK (Vedder) 1,565 feet 100 feet 33°
LO (Olig.?) 2,100 feet 75 feet 32°

Structurally the Tejon Hills field is located upon a northwest dipping homocline which is interrupted by the northeast-southwest trending Springs fault and its extensions. Other smaller accumulations are the result of anticlinal entrapment.

The field is located along the southeast margin of the Tejon Embayment which is outlined by the outcrop of granitic basement rock. The formations encountered in the Tejon Hills area have an average total thickness of 2015 feet and in order of penetration are as follows: Alluvium (100 feet), Chanac of Pliocene-Miocene age (250 feet), Santa Margarita sand of upper Miocene age (475 feet), Pulv. zone of upper Miocene age (70 feet), Valv. zone of middle Miocene age (400 feet), Olcese sand of middle and lower Miocene age (45 feet), BT zone (Freeman-Jewett equivalent) of lower Miocene age (200 feet), DK beds (Vedder equivalent) of lower Miocene age (125 feet) and LO Zone of Oligocene (?) age (350 feet) all resting unconformably on the basement complex.

As of January 1, 1965, the Tejon Hills oil field has produced a total of 11,513,707 barrels of 29° to 33° gravity oil and 2,167,118 MCF of gas. Field production, as of July, 1964, averaged 1,193 barrels daily. A total of 314 wells were completed in the field of which 178 still are producing.

Tejon Grapevine Oil Field

Fred E. Porter

The Tejon Grapevine oil field is located approximately 30 miles south of the city of Bakersfield and lies east of Highway 99 on the southeast margin of the San Joaquin Valley. The field is divided into four areas of production, the Eastern, Central, Southeastern and Western areas. During the early stages of development, it was believed that these areas were different structures which were separated by faulting or synclines, however continued drilling has shown that the separation between the Western and Central areas is mainly stratigraphic in the middle Miocene and younger beds, while the lower Miocene (Saucesian) JV sand lies in a continuous productive band along the north side of both areas. Total proven acreage for all field areas, as of January 1, 1965, was 1,985 acres.

Eastern Area

The Eastern area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field was discovered in November 1943 by Richfield Oil Corporation’s “Tejon A” 57-35 well located near the center of Sec. 35, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The well encountered oil showings in Chanac sands of Pliocene-Miocene age and was completed from the 2150 to 2370 foot interval for an initial production of 120 barrels daily of 18.2° gravity oil. Development of the Eastern area was largely completed by September 1947 at which time 18 wells were producing about 300 barrels of oil per day. Most of the wells are producing from basal Chanac (Transition) and Santa Margarita sands of upper Miocene age and a few wells, located favorably structurally, are producing from both formations. Producing horizons are encountered at an average depth of 2000 feet and have an average effective thickness of 150 feet. Maximum proven acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 210 acres.

The Eastern area is located upon a homoclinal structure which dips to the northwest. The oil accumulation appears to be the result of entrapment by faulting and permeability barriers.

Stratigraphically the Eastern area lies within a prominent embayment which is outlined by granitic basement rock. The formations encountered in the area have an average total thickness of 11,350 feet, although the complete sequence is not present in any one well. In order of penetration they are as follows: Kern River-Chanac undifferentiated of Pleistocene-Pliocene age (1,975 feet), basal Chanac (Transition zone) of probably upper Miocene age (130 feet), Santa Margarita sand of upper Miocene age (800 feet), Pulv. zone of upper Miocene age (350 feet), Valv. zone of middle Miocene age (300 feet), Olcese sand of middle and lower Miocene age (650 feet), upper Tecuya of lower Miocene age (750 feet), Basalt and Basaltic detritus of lower Miocene age (1,100 feet), lower Tecuya of lower Miocene age (2,100 feet), Vedder sands of lower Miocene age (1,050 feet), San Emigdio of Oligocene age (900 feet) and the Tejon of upper and middle Eocene age (1,250 feet plus or minus).

No oil production in the Eastern field area has come from beds older than upper Miocene age.

The Eastern area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field has produced a total of 1,228,189 barrels of oil since its discovery in 1947 and 249,575 MCF of gas. Field production, as of July 1, 1964, averaged 120 barrels daily of 16° to 19° gravity oil. A total of 23 wells were completed in the field area of which 20 are still producing.

Central Area

The Central area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field was discovered in March 1937 by Reserve Oil and Gas Company’s “No.” 33-3 well located in the northwest quarter of Sec. 33, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The well encountered showings in the Reserve sand (Pulv zone) of basal upper Miocene age and was completed for an estimated 12,000 MCF of gas daily. Development of the Central field area until 1948 was more or less limited to Chanac sands of Pliocene-Miocene age and the above Reserve zone sands. Other producing horizons, namely the Santa Margarita (Mohnian stage), Valv. (Luisian stage), Olcese (Relizian stage), JV (Saucesian stage) and additional Chanac and Reserve zone sands, were discovered during the period from 1948 to 1956. Development of the Central area was largely completed by 1960. Maximum proven acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 1,045 acres.

Structurally the Central area is located upon a northeast-southwest trending anticlinal fold with a fault on the south flank parallel to its axis. The fold is complicated by a number of small faults and its beds are subject to rapid stratigraphic changes. Most of the accumulations are the result of entrapment by a combination of faulting and stratigraphic changes.

The sediments encountered in the Central area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field are similar to those in other areas of the field. The formations have an average total thickness of 12,150 feet, although the complete stratigraphic section from Recent to Eocene is not present in any one well because of the numerous unconformities. In order of penetration they are as follows: Quaternary sands and gravels-Kern River undifferentiated (1,400 feet), Chanac of Pliocene-Miocene age (1,275 feet), basal Chanac (Transition zone) and Santa Margarita of upper Miocene age (1,525 feet), Pulv. zone of upper Miocene age (1,000 feet), Valv. zone of middle Miocene age (400 feet), Gould Shale and Olcese sand of middle and lower Miocene age (470 feet), Freeman-Jewett silt of lower Miocene age (1,150 feet), Basalt and Basaltic detritus of lower Miocene age (1,800 feet), Vedder sands of lower Miocene age (1,350 feet), San Emigdio of Oligocene age (1,280 feet) and the Tejon of upper and middle Eocene age (500 feet).

Average producing depths and sand thickness in the Central field area are as follows:

PRODUCING ZONE AVERAGE DEPTH AVERAGE THICKNESS OIL GRAVITY
Chanac (Transition zone) 2,725 feet 85 feet 16 to 18°
Santa Margarita 2,900 feet 105 feet 18°
Reserve 4,400 feet 80 feet 23 to 28°
Valv. 4,650 feet 80 feet 33°
Olcese 5,600 feet 170 feet 28 to 30°
JV 7,200 feet 50 feet 34 to 40°

The deepest well drilled in the Tejon Grapevine oil field was Standard Oil Company’s “No. C.C.M.O. 4” 35 (now C.W.O.D.’s well “No. SO-4”) located in Sec. 32, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M., the westerly portion of the Central area. The well was bottomed at 13,239 feet in beds of Eocene age.

The Central area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field has produced a total of 11,430,676 barrels of oil since its discovery in 1937 and 13,525,630 MCF of gas. Field production, as of July 1, 1964, averaged 794 barrels daily of 16° to 40° gravity oil. A total of 278 wells were completed in the Central field area of which 195 are still producing.

Southeastern Area

The Southeastern area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field is located approximately one mile southeast of the Central field area, occupying portions of Secs. 1 and 12, T. 10 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The area was discovered in June 1963 by Drilling and Production Company’s “No. 24R-12” well located in Sec. 12, T. 10 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The well encountered oil showings in Reserve zone sands of upper Miocene age and was completed from the 1835 to 1910 foot interval for an initial production of 102 barrels daily of 16.9° gravity oil cutting 20% water. Five wells are currently producing in this field area, and it appears that development has been completed. The oil bearing section of the upper Miocene Reserve zone ranges in thickness from 90 to 170 feet. Well depths average about 2,200 feet. Maximum proven acreage as of January 1, 1965, was 65 acres.

Structurally the Southeastern field area is located upon a gently dipping homocline with entrapment resulting from stratigraphic pinchout. Minor faulting is suspected to be present and may contribute to the structural closure.

The field area lies within the Tejon Embayment and sediments encountered are similar in most respects to those in other areas of the field. Oil production is restricted to oil sands of the upper Miocene Reserve zone.

The Southeastern area of the Tejon. Grapevine oil field has produced a total of 80,505 barrels of oil and 0 MCF of gas since its discovery in 1963. Field production, as of February 1, 1965, averaged 131 barrels daily, or about 26 barrels per well, of 17° gravity oil. A total of 7 wells were completed in the area of which 6 are still producing.

Western Area

The Western area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field was discovered in December 1945 by British-American Oil Producing Company’s and Capital Company’s “Tejon Ranch” 41-5 well located near the north quarter corner of Sec. 5, T. 10 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The well encountered showings of oil in basal Chanac (Transition zone) and Santa Margarita sands of upper Miocene age and was completed from the 2622 to 2660 foot interval for an initial production of 200 barrels daily of 16.5° gravity oil. Reserve zone production was established in November 1949 and Valv. zone production in October 1957. Transition zone-Santa Margarita development was completed late in 1947 and the deeper Reserve and Valv. zones development by 1960. Maximum proven acreage, as of January 1, 1965, was 665 acres.

Structurally the Transition zone-Santa Margarita sand entrapment is anticlinal, however deeper zone closure is effected by a combination of structural and stratigraphic changes.

The formations encountered in the Western field area are similar to those in other areas of the field. In order of penetration and average thickness they are as follows: Quaternary sands and gravels-Kern River series undifferentiated (1,650 feet), Chanac of Pliocene-Miocene age (800 feet), basal Chanac (Transition zone) and Santa Margarita of upper Miocene age (1,650 feet), Pulv. zone of upper Miocene age (375 feet), Valv. zone of middle Miocene age (850 feet), Olcese sand of middle and lower Miocene age (975 feet), Freeman-Jewett silt of lower Miocene age (725 feet), Basalt and Basalt detritus of lower Miocene age (1,600 feet), Vedder sands of lower Miocene age (2,900 feet), San Emigdio of Oligocene age (500 feet) and the Tejon of upper and middle Eocene age (approximately 550 feet).

Average producing depths and sand thickness in the Western field area are as follows:

PRODUCING ZONE AVERAGE DEPTH AVERAGE THICKNESS OIL GRAVITY
Transition zone—
Santa Margarita 2,600 feet 55 feet 14 to 18°
Reserve zone 4,600 feet 125 feet 20°
Valv. zone 5,400 feet 60 feet 18 to 20°

No oil production has been produced from sands older than middle Miocene in the Western area of the field.

As of January 1965, the Western area of the Tejon Grapevine oil field has produced a total of 9,948,552 barrels of oil and 2,873,282 MCF of gas. Field production, as of July 1, 1964, averaged 1,185 barrels daily of oil ranging in gravity from 14° to 20°. A total of 111 wells were completed in the field of which 89 are still producing.

North Tejon Field, South Area

Fred C. Porter

The South area of the North Tejon field directly adjoins the Main and Highway areas of the field and occupies portions of Secs. 29, 30 and 31, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B.&M. and a portion of Sec. 25, T. 11 N., R. 20 W. S.B.B.&M.

The South area of the field was discovered by Richfield Oil Corporation’s No. “Richfield-Mohawk-Wheeler Ridge Community” 16-30 well located in Sec. 30, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The well was completed from Pulv. zone sands of upper Miocene age on September 20, 1956 and initially produced 97 barrels daily of 27.5° gravity oil cutting 18% water. The South area was rapidly developed and by 1961 a total of 26 wells were producing from three zones, namely Pulv. of upper Miocene age, JV-Basalt of lower Miocene age and Vedder (Zemorrian stage) sands and silts of lower Miocene age. Average producing depths and sand thicknesses for the South field area are as follows:

PRODUCING ZONE AVERAGE DEPTH AVERAGE THICKNESS OIL GRAVITY
Pulv. 5,370 feet 230 feet 27°
JV sand 8,150 feet 85 feet 37° to 58°
Basalt 7,800 feet 50 feet 38°
Vedder (Zemorrian-Z-O ZIR and ZI) 9,000 feet 110 feet 36°

Structurally the entrapment is provided by a combination of permeability variations, lenticularity of sands and complex faulting on the east flank of an anticlinal or domal structure.

Stratigraphically the South area is similar to the northern Main and Highway areas of the field except for the development of sands within, and immediately above, the Saucesian volcanics. The “JV” sand is a quartzose, bentonitic, fine grained, generally well sorted, and very lenticular sand, interbedded with thin marine shales on an irregular surface of volcanics and volcanic detritus. The formations encountered in the South area have an average combined thickness of 11,600 feet and in order of their penetration are as follows: Alluvium-Kern River-Chanac series undifferentiated of from Recent to Pliocene-Miocene age (3,000 feet), Santa Margarita-Fruitvale shale (including the Pulv. zone) of upper Miocene age (2,800 feet), Round Mountain silt of middle Miocene age (600 feet), Olcese of middle and lower Miocene age (300 feet). Free-man-Jewett silt (including the JV sand) of lower Miocene age (1,600 feet), Basalt with sand and silt lenses of lower Miocene age (1,000 feet) and Vedder sands and silts of lower Miocene age (2,100 feet plus or minus).

Accumulative production for the South area of the North Tejon field, as of January 1, 1961, was 814,613 barrels of oil and 14,410,312 MCF of gas.

North Tejon Field, Main and Highway Areas

Fred E. Porter

The North Tejon field is located approximately 25 miles south of the city of Bakersfield in the southeastern part of the San Joaquin Valley and lies about two and one-half miles north of the Tejon Grapevine field. The field is divided into three areas, the Main, Highway and South areas, the latter appearing to be a southerly extension of the Highway area. Production is continuous between the three areas, and the separation between them is somewhat arbitrary. The maximum proven acreage of the three areas, as of January 1,1965 was 2,640 acres.

The discovery well in the Main area of the field was Reserve Oil and Gas Company’s No. “Reserve-Butler-Wehr” 67-18 (now “BW” 67-18) located in Sec. 18, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. The well was completed in March 1957 from Vedder sand of lower Miocene (Zemorrian) age for an initial production of 244 barrels daily of 32.5° gravity oil and 310 MCF of gas cutting 0.4% water. The Highway area, a westerly field extension, was discovered in April 1958 by Richfield Oil Corporation’s No. “KCL I” 81-24 well located in Sec. 24, T. 11 N., R. 20 W., S.B.B. & M. The well was completed on May 14, 1958 for 240 barrels daily of 34.5° gravity oil cutting 0.1% water. An active development program followed the Main and Highway discoveries, the areas being largely delineated by 1961. Production is principally obtained in the Main area from a series of Vedder sands of lower Miocene age and in a minor way from Olcese sands of middle and lower Miocene age. Highway area production is derived from Vedder sands of lower Miocene age, Oligocene (?) sands (R-1 and R-2) of the San Emigdio Formation and Eocene sands of the Tejon Formation. Average producing depths and sand thicknesses for the two areas are as follows:

PRODUCING ZONE AVERAGE DEPTH AVERAGE THICKNESS OIL GRAVITY
Main Area
Olcese 7,300 feet 180 feet 36°
Vedder (Zemorrian) 11,000 to 12,000 feet 6, Z sands have combined thickness of 2,000 feet 30° to 38°
Highway Area
Vedder (Zemorrian) 8,600 feet (as above stated) 30° to 61°
Oligocene (R-1 & R-2) 10,900 feet 100 feet oil comingled
Eocene 11,000 feet 400 feet 33° to 57°

In general the Main and Highway areas of the North Tejon field are located upon a highly faulted, northerly plunging nose which broadens into an east-west trending flank. Faulting and permeability barriers are the main factors governing oil entrapment

The formations encountered in the Main and Highway areas have an, average combined thickness of 14,200 feet. Formational thickness varies from well to well and the Basalt series ranges in thickness from 2,300 feet in the Main area to about 50 feet in the Highway area. The formations in order of their penetration and average thickness are as follows: Alluvium-Kern River-Chanac of Recent to Pliocene-Miocene age undifferentiated (3,400 feet), Santa Margarita-Fruitvale shale of upper Miocene age (2,000 feet), Round Mountain silt of middle Miocene age (1,400 feet), Olcese of middle and lower Miocene age (700 feet), Freeman-Jewett silt of lower Miocene age (1,600 feet), Basalt of lower Miocene age (1,500 feet) Vedder sands and silts of lower Miocene age (2,000 feet), San Emigdio of Oligocene (?) age (400 feet) and the Tejon of Eocene age (1,200 feet plus or minus).

The deepest well drilled in the North Tejon field was Reserve Oil and Gas Company’s No. “R-S-T” 187-19 located in Sec. 19, T. 11 N., R. 19 W., S.B.B. & M. in the Main field area. The well was bottomed at 14,205 feet in sediments of Eocene age.

The North Tejon field, including all three producing areas, has produced a total of 15,509,030 barrels of oil and 136,433,519 MCF of gas as of January 1, 1965. This production may be broken down into zones as follows:

PRODUCING ZONE 011,/BARRELS GAS/MCE
Olcese 169,840 212,970
JV-Basalt 977,333 18,124,685
Vedder-Olig.-Eocene 14,361,857 118,095,943

Field production, as of July 1, 1964, averaged 5,507 barrels daily of oil ranging in gravity from 31° to 61°. A total of 112 wells were completed in the three field areas of which 104 are still producing.

References

Wesley G. Bruer

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Fred E. Porter

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California Division of Oil and Gas, 1948, Summary of Operations, v. 34, no. 1, p. 3-12.

California Division of Oil and Gas, 1950, Summary of Operations, v. 36, no. 1, p. 15-17.

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Craig, A. W., 1952, A.A.P.G. - S.E.P.M. - S.E.G. Guidebook, p. 138-139.

Fitzgerald, T. J., 1952, A.A.P.G. - S.E.P.M. - S.E.G. Guidebook, p. 145-47.

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Copyright © 2009 by AAPG Pacific Section

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